“Moneyball” and Your Business

 

It’s MLB playoff time, and my team (the Tribe) is there, again.  (Pregnant pause to enjoy the moment.)

A while back, the film “Moneyball” showed us how the Oakland A’s built a super-competitive sports franchise on analytics, essentially “competing on analytics”, within relevant business parameters of a major league baseball franchise.  The “Moneyball” saga and other examples of premier organizations competing on analytics were featured in the January 2006 Harvard Business Review article, “Competing on Analytics” (reprint R0601H) by Thomas Davenport, who also authored the book by the same name.

The noted German doctor, pathologist, biologist, and politician, Rudolph Ludwig Karl Virchow called the task of science “to stake out the limits of the knowable.”  We might paraphrase Rudolph Virchow and say that the task of analytics is to enable you to stake out everything that you can possibly know from your data.

So, what do these thoughts by Davenport and Virchow have in common?

In your business, you strive to make the highest quality decisions today about how to run your business tomorrow with the uncertainty that tomorrow brings.  That means you have to know everything you possibly can know today.  In an effort to do this, many companies have invested, or are considering an investment, in supply chain intelligence or various analytics software packages.  Yet, many companies who have made huge investments know only a fraction of what they should know from their ERP and other systems.  Their executives seem anxious to explore “predictive” analytics or “AI”, because it sounds good.  But, investing in software tools without understanding what you need to do and how is akin to attempting surgery with wide assortment of specialized tools, but without having gone to medical school.

Are you competing on analytics?

Are you making use of all of the data available to support better decisions in less time?

Can you instantly see what’s inhibiting your revenue, margin and working capital goals across the entire business in a context?

Do you leverage analytics in the “cloud” for computing at scale and information that is always on and always current?

I appreciate everyone who stops by for a quick read.  I hope you found this both helpful and thought-provoking.

As we enter this weekend, I leave you with one more thought that relates to “business intelligence” — this time, attributed to Socrates:

“The wisest man is he who knows his own ignorance.”

Do you know what you don’t know?  Do I?

Have a wonderful weekend!

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Part 4 (Final) – A New Supply Chain Planning Paradigm for the Digital Value Network?

In Part 1, I introduced the 3-D Cycle that integrates the 3 dimensions of orchestrating a value network.  In Part 2, I defined the 3-D Cycle in more detail.  In Part 3 I explored the some of the challenges and industry imperatives, drawing on some examples from retail (thought I’d pick one of the more challenging industries).  In this final Part 4, I’ll explore what the 3-D Cycle looks like in terms of specific examples and architecture.

Detect, Diagnose and Direct with Speed, Precision & Advanced Analytics

Detection of incidental challenges (e.g. demand is surging or falling based on local demographics, a shipment is about to arrive late, a vendor is behind on production, etc.) in your value network can be significantly automated to take place in almost real-time, or at least, in relevant time.   Detection of systemic challenges will be a bit more gradual and is based on the metrics that matter to your business, such as customer service, days of supply, etc., but it is the speed and, therefore, the scope, that is now possible that drives better visibility through detection.

 

Diagnosing the causes of incidental problems is only limited by the organization and detail of your transactional data.  Diagnosing systemic challenges requires a hierarchy of metrics with respect to cause and effect (such as the SCOR® model).  Certainly, diagnosis can now happen with new speed, but it is the combination of speed and precision that makes a new level of understanding possible through diagnosis.

 

With a clean, complete, synchronized data set that is always available and always current, as well as a proactive view of what is happening and why, you need to direct the next best action while it still matters.  You need to optimize your trade-offs and perform scenario and sensitivity analysis.

The chart, below, shows both incidental/operational and systemic/strategic examples for all three dimensions of the 3-D Cycle.

 

 

Speed in detection, speed and precision in diagnosis, and the culmination of speed, precision and advanced analytics in decision-making give you the power to transpose the performance of your value network to levels not previously possible.  Much of the entire 3-D Cycle and the prerequisite data synchronization can be, and will be, automated by industry leaders.  Just how “autonomous” those decisions become remains to be seen.

 

Fortunately, you don’t need “Skynet”, but a faster and better 3-D Cycle is fundamental to your journey toward the digital transformation of your value network.

 

The basic ideas of detecting, diagnosing and directing are not novel to supply chain professionals and other business executives.   However, the level of transparency, speed, precision and advanced analytics that are now available mandate a new approach and promise dramatic results.  Some will gradually evolve toward a better, faster 3-D cycle.  The greatest rewards will accrue to enterprises that climb each hill with a vision of the pinnacle, adjusting as they learn.  These organizations will attract more revenue and investment.  Companies that don’t capitalize on the possibilities will be relegated to hoping for acquisition by those that do.

 

Admittedly, I’m pretty bad at communicating graphically, but I’ve attempted to draft a couple rudimentary visuals of what the architecture to support a state-of-the-art 3-D Cycle could look like (below), as a vehicle for facilitating discussion.  I do realize that the divisions I’m showing between Cloud, IoT, Extended Apps, and ERP are somewhat arbitrary and definitely fluid.

 

 

 

 

 

So, I imagine that I’m at least partly wrong, and could be completely wrong-headed . . . but, then again, maybe not.  I will say this:  The convergence of cloud business intelligence (BI) technology and traditional advanced planning solutions supports my point, and that is definitely happening.  Cloud BI solutions (e.g. Aera, Birst, Board) incorporate at least some machine learning (ML) algorithms for prediction, while Oracle, Microsoft, IBM, and SAP are all making ML available in their portfolios, adjacent to their BI applications.  Logility recently purchased Halo which embeds ML.  Most importantly, Oracle and SAP have built their cloud supply chain planning solutions with embedded BI, really making an effort toward a faster, better 3-D Cycle.

 

So, the future would appear to be now.  If that’s true, you have to ask yourself whether your current paradigm for value network planning will guide you to competitive advantage or leave you hoping that someone else will ask you to the dance.

 

I’ll leave you with this thought of my own:  You can only live today once.

 

Thanks for stopping buy.

 

Part 3 – A New Supply Chain Planning Paradigm for the Digital Value Network?

In Part 1, I introduced the 3-D Cycle that integrates the 3 dimensions of orchestrating a value network.  In Part 2, I defined the 3-D Cycle in more detail.  In this post, Part 3, I’ll explore the some of the challenges and industry imperatives, drawing on some examples from retail (thought I’d pick one of the more challenging industries).  Next and finally, in Part 4, I’ll explore what the 3-D Cycle looks like in terms of specific examples and architecture.

Data Is the Double-edged Sword

The universe of data is exploding exponentially from growing connections among organizations, people and things, creating the need for an ever-accelerating 3-D Cycle.  This is especially relevant for retailers, and it presents both a challenge and an opportunity for competing with your digital value network in the global digital economy.

 

For example, redesigned, retail supply chains, enabled with analytics and augmented reality (AR), are not only meeting, but raising consumer expectations.

 

Amazon’s re-imagination of retail means that competitors must now think in terms of many-to-many flows of information, product, and cash along the path of least resistance for the consumer (and not just to and from their own locations).  This kind of value network strategy goes beyond determining where to put a warehouse and to which stores it should ship.  Competing in today’s multi-channel world can mean inventing new ways to do business, even in the challenging fashion space – and if it is happening in fashion, it would be naive to think rising consumer expectations can be ignored in other retail segments, or even other industries.  Consider a few retail examples:

Zara leverages advanced analytics, not only to sense trends, but also to optimize pricing and operations in their vertically integrated supply chain.

Stitch Fix is changing the shopping model completely, providing more service with less infrastructure.

Zolando has been so successful in creating a rapid response supply chain that they are now providing services to other retailers.

Nordstrom, of all organizations, is opening “inventoryless” stores.

Walmart has been on an incredible acquisition and partnership spree, recently buying Flipkart and, as early as two years ago, partnering with JD.com.  And, then, there is the success of Walmart.com.

Target is redesigning the way their DC’s work, creating a flow-through operation with smaller replenishment quantities.

 

Yet, many companies are choking on their own ERP data, as they struggle to make decisions on incomplete, incorrect and disparate data.  So, while the need for the 3-D Cycle to keep pace grows more intense, some organizations struggle to do anything but watch.  The winners will be those who can capitalize on the opportunities that the data explosion affords by making better decisions faster through advanced analytics.

 

The time required just to collect, clean, transform and synchronize data for analysis remains fundamental barrier to better detection, diagnosis and decisions in the value network.  A consolidated data store that can connect to source systems and on which data can be consolidated, programmatically “wrangled”, and updated into a supra data set forms a solid foundation on which to build better detection, diagnosis, and decision logic that can execute in “relevant time”.  This can seem like an almost insurmountable challenge, but it is not only doable with today’s technology, it’s becoming imperative.  And, it’s now possible to work off of a virtual supra data set, but that’s a discussion for another day.

 

Thanks for stopping by.  I’ll leave you with this quote from the book, Hit Refresh (a read I thoroughly enjoyed), by Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft:

 

“Success can cause people to unlearn the habits that made them successful in the first place.”

Part 2 – A New Supply Chain Planning Paradigm for the Digital Value Network?

In Part 1, I introduced the 3-D Cycle that integrates the 3 dimensions of orchestrating a value network.  In this post, I’ll define the 3-D Cycle in more detail.  Later, in Part 3, I’ll explore the some of the challenges and industry imperatives, drawing on some examples from retail (thought I’d pick one of the more challenging industries).  Finally, in Part 4, I’ll explore what the 3-D Cycle looks like in terms of specific examples and architecture.

Detect, Diagnose, Direct

The work of managing the value network has always been to make the best plan, monitor issues, and respond effectively and efficiently.  However, since reality begins to diverge almost immediately from even the best plans, perhaps the most vital challenges in orchestrating a value network are monitoring and responding.

 

In fact, every plan is really just a response to the latest challenges and their causes.

 

So, if we focus on monitoring and responding, we are covering all the bases of what planners and executives do all day . . . every day.

 

Monitoring involves detecting and diagnosing those issues which require a response.  Responding is really directing the next best action.  That’s why we can think in terms of the “Detect, Diagnose, Direct Cycle”:

 

  1. Detect (and/or anticipate) market requirements and the challenges in meeting them
  2. Diagnose the causes of the challenges, both incidental and systemic
  3. Direct the next best action within the constraints of time and cost

 

The 3-D Cycle used to take a month, in cases where it was even possible.  Digitization – increased computing power, more analytical software, the availability of data – has made it possible in a week.  Routine, narrowly defined, short-term changes are now addressed even more quickly under a steady state – and a lot of controlled automation is not only possible in this case, but obligatory through robotic process automation (RPA).  However, no business remains in a steady state, and changes from that state require critical decisions which add or destroy significant value.   

 

You will need to excel at managing and accelerating the 3-D Cycle, if you want to win in digital economy.

 

There is no industry where mastering this Cycle is more challenging than in retail, but the principles apply across most industries.

Thanks for stopping by.  Next up is Part 3.  I’ll leave you with this thought from Cicero to ponder:

 

A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all other virtues.

Part 1 – A New Supply Chain Planning Paradigm for the Digital Value Network?

Photo licensed through iStockphoto

The strength of any chain is defined by its weakest link.  A supply chain, or as I prefer to say, a value network, is similarly constrained.  By orchestrating the flow of material, information and cash through your value network, you can prevent negative business impact from weak links by detecting anomalies, diagnosing their causes, and directing the next best action before there is a serious business impact.  Do you need some kind of self-aware artificial intelligence to make this work?  Let’s think about that for a minute.

 

 

 

Photo licensed through Shutterstock

 

 

There is a lot of buzz about the “autonomous” supply chain these days.  The subject came up at a conference I attended where the theme was the supply chain of 2030.  But, before we turn out the lights and lock the door to a fully automated, self-aware, supply chain “Skynet”, let’s take a moment and put this idea into some perspective.

 

 

 

The Driverless Car Analogy

I’ve heard the driverless vehicle used as an analogy for the autonomous supply chain.  However, orchestrating the value network where goods, information and currency pulse freely, fast, and securely between facilities, organizations, and even consumers, following the path of least resistance (aka the digital supply chain), may prove to be even more complex than driving a vehicle.  Digital technologies, such as additive manufacturing, blockchain, and more secure IoT infrastructure, advance the freedom, speed and security of these flows.  As these technologies makes more automation possible, as well as a kind of “autonomy”, the difficulty and importance of guiding these flows becomes ever more crucial.  

 

Most sixteen-year-old adolescents can successfully drive a car, but you may not want to entrust your global value network to them.

 

 

Before you can have an autonomous supply chain, you need to accelerate the Detect, Diagnose, Direct Cycle – let’s call it the 3-D Cycle, for short, not just because it’s alliterated, but because each “D” is one of three key dimensions of orchestrating your value network.  In fact, as you accelerate the 3-D Cycle, you will learn just how much automation and autonomy makes sense.

 

That’s Part 1 – the teaser.  Soon to be followed by Part 2 where I take a closer look at the 3-D Cycle.

 

Thanks for stopping by.  I’ll leave you with this bit of verse (public domain) to ponder from the great Emily Dickinson:

 

Hope is the thing with feathers  
That perches in the soul,  
And sings the tune without the words,  
And never stops at all,  
   
And sweetest in the gale is heard;          
And sore must be the storm  
That could abash the little bird  
That kept so many warm.  
   
I’ve heard it in the chillest land,  
And on the strangest sea;         
Yet, never, in extremity,  
It asked a crumb of me.

A Digital Value Network Needs an Accelerated “3-D” Cycle

Photo licensed through iStockphoto

The strength of any chain is defined by its weakest link.  A supply chain, or as I prefer to say, a value network, is similarly constrained.  By orchestrating the flow of material, information and cash through your value network, you can prevent negative business impact from weak links by detecting anomalies, diagnosing their causes, and directing the next best action before there is a serious business impact.  Do you need some kind of self-aware artificial intelligence to make this work?  Let’s think about that for a minute.

 

 

 

Photo licensed through Shutterstock

 

 

There is a lot of buzz about the “autonomous” supply chain these days.  The subject came up at a conference I attended where the theme was the supply chain of 2030.  But, before we turn out the lights and lock the door to a fully automated, self-aware, supply chain “Skynet”, let’s take a moment and put this idea into some perspective.

 

 

 

The Driverless Car Analogy

I’ve heard the driverless vehicle used as an analogy for the autonomous supply chain.  However, orchestrating the value network where goods, information and currency pulse freely, fast, and securely between facilities, organizations, and even consumers, following the path of least resistance (aka the digital supply chain), may prove to be even more complex than driving a vehicle.  Digital technologies, such as additive manufacturing, blockchain, and more secure IoT infrastructure, advance the freedom, speed and security of these flows.  As these technologies makes more automation possible, as well as a kind of “autonomy”, the difficulty and importance of guiding these flows becomes ever more crucial.  

 

Most sixteen-year-old adolescents can successfully drive a car, but you may not want to entrust your global value network to them.

 

 

Before you can have an autonomous supply chain, you need to accelerate the Detect, Diagnose, Direct Cycle – let’s call it the 3-D Cycle, for short, not just because it’s alliterated, but because each “D” is one of three key dimensions of orchestrating your value network.  In fact, as you accelerate the 3-D Cycle, you will learn just how much automation and autonomy makes sense.

 

Figure 1

Detect, Diagnose, Direct

The work of managing the value network has always been to make the best plan, monitor issues, and respond effectively and efficiently.  However, since reality begins to diverge almost immediately from even the best plans, perhaps the most vital challenges in orchestrating a value network are monitoring and responding.

 

In fact, every plan is really just a response to the latest challenges and their causes.

 

So, if we focus on monitoring and responding, we are covering all the bases of what planners and executives do all day . . . every day.

 

Monitoring involves detecting and diagnosing those issues which require a response.  Responding is really directing the next best action.  That’s why we can think in terms of the “Detect, Diagnose, Direct Cycle”:

 

  1. Detect (and/or anticipate) market requirements and the challenges in meeting them
  2. Diagnose the causes of the challenges, both incidental and systemic
  3. Direct the next best action within the constraints of time and cost

 

The 3-D Cycle used to take a month, in cases where it was even possible.  Digitization – increased computing power, more analytical software, the availability of data – has made it possible in a week.  Routine, narrowly defined, short-term changes are now addressed even more quickly under a steady state – and a lot of controlled automation is not only possible in this case, but obligatory robotic process automation (RPA).  However, no business remains in a steady state, and changes from that state require critical decisions which add or destroy significant value.   

 

You will need to excel at managing and accelerating the 3-D Cycle, if you want to win in digital economy.

 

There is no industry where mastering this Cycle is more challenging than in retail, but the principles apply across most industries.

Data Is the Double-edged Sword

The universe of data is exploding exponentially from growing connections among organizations, people and things, creating the need for an ever-accelerating 3-D Cycle.  This is especially relevant for retailers, and it presents both a challenge and an opportunity for competing with your digital value network in the global digital economy.

 

For example, redesigned, retail supply chains, enabled with analytics and augmented reality (AR), are not only meeting, but raising consumer expectations.

 

Figure 2

Amazon’s re-imagination of retail means that competitors must now think in terms of many-to-many flows of information, product, and cash along the path of least resistance for the consumer (and not just to and from their own locations).  This kind of value network strategy goes beyond determining where to put a warehouse and to which stores it should ship.  Competing in today’s multi-channel world can mean inventing new ways to do business, even in the challenging fashion space – and if it is happening in fashion, it would be naive to think rising consumer expectations can be ignored in other retail segments, or even other industries.  Consider a few retail examples:

Zara leverages advanced analytics, not only to sense trends, but also to optimize pricing and operations in their vertically integrated supply chain.

Stitch Fix is changing the shopping model completely, providing more service with less infrastructure.

Zolando has been so successful in creating a rapid response supply chain that they are now providing services to other retailers.

Nordstrom, of all organizations, is opening “inventoryless” stores.

Walmart has been on an incredible acquisition and partnership spree, recently buying Flipkart and, as early as two years ago, partnering with JD.com.  And, then, there is the success of Walmart.com.

Target is redesigning the way their DC’s work, creating a flow-through operation with smaller replenishment quantities.

 

Yet, many companies are choking on their own ERP data, as they struggle to make decisions on incomplete, incorrect and disparate data.  So, while the need for the 3-D Cycle to keep pace grows more intense, some organizations struggle to do anything but watch.  The winners will be those who can capitalize on the opportunities that the data explosion affords by making better decisions faster through advanced analytics (see Figure 2).

 

The time required just to collect, clean, transform and synchronize data for analysis remains fundamental barrier to better detection, diagnosis and decisions in the value network.  A consolidated data store that can connect to source systems and on which data can be consolidated, programmatically “wrangled”, and updated into a supra data set forms a solid foundation on which to build better detection, diagnosis, and decision logic that can execute in “relevant time”.  This can seem like an almost insurmountable challenge, but it is not only doable with today’s technology, it’s becoming imperative.  And, it’s now possible to work off of a virtual supra data set, but that’s a discussion for another day.

Detect, Diagnose and Direct with Speed, Precision & Advanced Analytics

Detection of incidental challenges (e.g. demand is surging or falling based on local demographics, a shipment is about to arrive late, a vendor is behind on production, etc.) in your value network can be significantly automated to take place in almost real-time, or at least, in relevant time.   Detection of systemic challenges will be a bit more gradual and is based on the metrics that matter to your business, such as customer service, days of supply, etc., but it is the speed and, therefore, the scope, that is now possible that drives better visibility through detection.

 

Diagnosing the causes of incidental problems is only limited by the organization and detail of your transactional data.  Diagnosing systemic challenges requires a hierarchy of metrics with respect to cause and effect (such as the SCOR® model).  Certainly, diagnosis can now happen with new speed, but it is the combination of speed and precision that makes a new level of understanding possible through diagnosis.

 

With a clean, complete, synchronized data set that is always available and always current, as well as a proactive view of what is happening and why, you need to direct the next best action while it still matters.  You need to optimize your trade-offs and perform scenario and sensitivity analysis.

Figure 3, below, shows both incidental/operational and systemic/strategic examples for all three dimensions of the 3-D Cycle.

Figure 3

 

 

Speed in detection, speed and precision in diagnosis, and the culmination of speed, precision and advanced analytics in decision-making give you the power to transpose the performance of your value network to levels not previously possible.  Much of the entire 3-D Cycle and the prerequisite data synchronization can be, and will be, automated by industry leaders.  Just how “autonomous” those decisions become remains to be seen.

 

Fortunately, you don’t need “Skynet”, but a faster and better 3-D Cycle is fundamental to your journey toward the digital transformation of your value network.

 

The basic ideas of detecting, diagnosing and directing are not novel to supply chain professionals and other business executives.   However, the level of transparency, speed, precision and advanced analytics that are now available mandate a new approach and promise dramatic results.  Some will gradually evolve toward a better, faster 3-D cycle.  The greatest rewards will accrue to enterprises that climb each hill with a vision of the pinnacle, adjusting as they learn.  These organizations will attract more revenue and investment.  Companies that don’t capitalize on the possibilities will be relegated to hoping for acquisition by those that do.

 

Admittedly, I’m pretty bad at communicating graphically, but I’ve attempted to draft a couple rudimentary visuals of what the architecture to support a state-of-the-art 3-D Cycle could look like (Figures 4 and 5, below), as a vehicle for facilitating discussion.  I do realize that the divisions I’m showing between Cloud, IoT, Extended Apps, and ERP are somewhat arbitrary and definitely fluid.

 

Figure 4

Figure 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, I imagine that I’m at least partly wrong, and could be completely wrong-headed . . . but, then again, maybe not.  I will say this:  The convergence of cloud business intelligence (BI) technology and traditional advanced planning solutions supports my point, and that is definitely happening.  Cloud BI solutions (e.g. Aera, Birst, Board) incorporate at least some machine learning (ML) algorithms for prediction, while Oracle, Microsoft, IBM, and SAP are all making ML available in their portfolios, adjacent to their BI applications.  Many advanced planning vendors are pitching “control towers” which are really an attempt to move toward combining BI capabilities and planning.  Logility recently purchased Halo which embeds ML.  Perhaps most importantly, Oracle has built their cloud supply chain planning solutions with embedded BI, really making an effort toward a faster, better 3-D Cycle.

 

So, the future would appear to be now.  If that’s true, you have to ask yourself whether your current paradigm for value network planning will guide you to competitive advantage or leave you hoping that someone else will ask you to the dance.

 

I’ll leave you with this thought for the weekend:  I know more now than I once did, especially about how much I still don’t know that I don’t know.

 

Have a wonderful weekend!

 

Analytics vs. Humalytics

I have a background in operations research and analysis so, as you might expect, I am biased toward optimization and other types of analytical models for supply chain planning and operational decision-making.   Of course, you know the obvious and running challenges that users of these models face:

  1. The data inputs for such a model are never free of defects
  2. The data model that serves as the basis for a decision model is always deficient as a representation of reality
  3. As soon a model is run, the constantly evolving reality increasingly deviates from the basis of the model

Still, models and tools that help decision-makers integrate many complex, interrelated trade-offs can enable significantly better decisions.

But, what if we could outperform very large complex periodic decision models through a sort of “existential optimization” or as a former colleague of mine put it, “humalytics“?

Here is the question expressed more fully:

If decision-makers within procurement, manufacturing and distribution and sales had the “right time” information about tradeoffs and how their individual contributions were affecting their performance and that of the enterprise, could they collectively outperform a comprehensive optimization/decision model that is run periodically (e.g. monthly/quarterly) in the same way that market-based economies easily outperform centrally planned economies?

I would call this approach “humalytics” (borrowed from a former colleague, Russell Halper, but please don’t blame him for the content of this post!), leveraging a network of the most powerful analytical engines – the human brain, empowered with quantified analytical inputs that are updated in “real-time” or as close to that as required.  In this way, the manager can combine these analytics with factors that might not be included in a decision model from their experience and knowledge of the business to constantly make the best decisions with regard to replenishment and fulfillment through “humalytics”, resulting in constantly increasing value of the organization.

In other words, decision-maker would have instant, always-on access to both performance metrics and the tradeoffs that affect them.  For example, a customer service manager might see a useful visualization of actual total cost of fulfillment (cost of inventory and cost of disservice) and the key drivers such as actual fill rates and inventory turns as they are happening, summarized in the most meaningful way, so that the responsible human can make the most informed “humalytical” decisions.

Up until now, the answer has been negative for at least two reasons:

A. Established corporate norms and culture in which middle management (and maybe sometimes even senior management) strive diligently for the status quo.

B. Lack of timely and complete information and analytics that would enable decision-makers to act as responsible, accountable agents within an organization, the same way that entrepreneurs act within a market economy.

With your indulgence, I’m going to deal with these in reverse order.

A few software companies have been hacking away at obstacle B.”, and we may be approaching a tipping point where the challenge of accurate, transparent information and relevant, timely analytics can be delivered in near real-time, even on mobile devices, allowing the human decision-makers to constantly adjust their actions to deliver continuously improved performance.  This is what I am calling “humalytics”.

But the network of human decision-makers with descriptive metrics is not enough.  Critical insights into tradeoffs and metrics come through analytical models, leveraging capabilities like machine learning, optimization, RPA, maybe in the form of “mini-apps” models that operate on a curated supra set of data that is always on and always current.  So, at least two things are necessary:

1. Faster optimization and other analytical modeling techniques from which the essential information is delivered in “right time” to each decision-maker

2. An empowered network of (human) decision-makers who understand the quantitative analytics that are delivered to them and who have a solid understanding of the business and their part in it

In current robotics research there is a vast body of work on algorithms and control methods for groups of decentralized cooperating robots, called a swarm or collective. (ftp://ftp.deas.harvard.edu/techreports/tr-06-11.pdf)  Maybe, we don’t need swarm of robots, after all.  Maybe we just need empowered decision-makers who not only engage in Sales and Operations Planning (or, if you will, Integrated Business Planning), but integrated business thinking and acting on an hourly (or right time) basis.

What think you?

If you think this might make sense for your business, or if you are working on implementing this approach, I’d be very interested to learn your perspective and how you are moving forward.

I leave you with these words from Leo Tolstoy, “There is no greatness where there is no simplicity, goodness, and truth.”

Have a wonderful weekend!

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