Part 4 (Final) – A New Supply Chain Planning Paradigm for the Digital Value Network?

In Part 1, I introduced the 3-D Cycle that integrates the 3 dimensions of orchestrating a value network.  In Part 2, I defined the 3-D Cycle in more detail.  In Part 3 I explored the some of the challenges and industry imperatives, drawing on some examples from retail (thought I’d pick one of the more challenging industries).  In this final Part 4, I’ll explore what the 3-D Cycle looks like in terms of specific examples and architecture.

Detect, Diagnose and Direct with Speed, Precision & Advanced Analytics

Detection of incidental challenges (e.g. demand is surging or falling based on local demographics, a shipment is about to arrive late, a vendor is behind on production, etc.) in your value network can be significantly automated to take place in almost real-time, or at least, in relevant time.   Detection of systemic challenges will be a bit more gradual and is based on the metrics that matter to your business, such as customer service, days of supply, etc., but it is the speed and, therefore, the scope, that is now possible that drives better visibility through detection.

 

Diagnosing the causes of incidental problems is only limited by the organization and detail of your transactional data.  Diagnosing systemic challenges requires a hierarchy of metrics with respect to cause and effect (such as the SCOR® model).  Certainly, diagnosis can now happen with new speed, but it is the combination of speed and precision that makes a new level of understanding possible through diagnosis.

 

With a clean, complete, synchronized data set that is always available and always current, as well as a proactive view of what is happening and why, you need to direct the next best action while it still matters.  You need to optimize your trade-offs and perform scenario and sensitivity analysis.

The chart, below, shows both incidental/operational and systemic/strategic examples for all three dimensions of the 3-D Cycle.

 

 

Speed in detection, speed and precision in diagnosis, and the culmination of speed, precision and advanced analytics in decision-making give you the power to transpose the performance of your value network to levels not previously possible.  Much of the entire 3-D Cycle and the prerequisite data synchronization can be, and will be, automated by industry leaders.  Just how “autonomous” those decisions become remains to be seen.

 

Fortunately, you don’t need “Skynet”, but a faster and better 3-D Cycle is fundamental to your journey toward the digital transformation of your value network.

 

The basic ideas of detecting, diagnosing and directing are not novel to supply chain professionals and other business executives.   However, the level of transparency, speed, precision and advanced analytics that are now available mandate a new approach and promise dramatic results.  Some will gradually evolve toward a better, faster 3-D cycle.  The greatest rewards will accrue to enterprises that climb each hill with a vision of the pinnacle, adjusting as they learn.  These organizations will attract more revenue and investment.  Companies that don’t capitalize on the possibilities will be relegated to hoping for acquisition by those that do.

 

Admittedly, I’m pretty bad at communicating graphically, but I’ve attempted to draft a couple rudimentary visuals of what the architecture to support a state-of-the-art 3-D Cycle could look like (below), as a vehicle for facilitating discussion.  I do realize that the divisions I’m showing between Cloud, IoT, Extended Apps, and ERP are somewhat arbitrary and definitely fluid.

 

 

 

 

 

So, I imagine that I’m at least partly wrong, and could be completely wrong-headed . . . but, then again, maybe not.  I will say this:  The convergence of cloud business intelligence (BI) technology and traditional advanced planning solutions supports my point, and that is definitely happening.  Cloud BI solutions (e.g. Aera, Birst, Board) incorporate at least some machine learning (ML) algorithms for prediction, while Oracle, Microsoft, IBM, and SAP are all making ML available in their portfolios, adjacent to their BI applications.  Logility recently purchased Halo which embeds ML.  Most importantly, Oracle and SAP have built their cloud supply chain planning solutions with embedded BI, really making an effort toward a faster, better 3-D Cycle.

 

So, the future would appear to be now.  If that’s true, you have to ask yourself whether your current paradigm for value network planning will guide you to competitive advantage or leave you hoping that someone else will ask you to the dance.

 

I’ll leave you with this thought of my own:  You can only live today once.

 

Thanks for stopping buy.

 

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About Arnold Mark Wells
Industry, software, and consulting background. I help companies do the things about which I write. If you think it might make sense to explore one of these topics for your organization, I would be delighted to hear from you. I am currently employed by AVATA, but I am solely responsible for the content in Supply Chain Action.

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