Part 3 – A New Supply Chain Planning Paradigm for the Digital Value Network?

In Part 1, I introduced the 3-D Cycle that integrates the 3 dimensions of orchestrating a value network.  In Part 2, I defined the 3-D Cycle in more detail.  In this post, Part 3, I’ll explore the some of the challenges and industry imperatives, drawing on some examples from retail (thought I’d pick one of the more challenging industries).  Next and finally, in Part 4, I’ll explore what the 3-D Cycle looks like in terms of specific examples and architecture.

Data Is the Double-edged Sword

The universe of data is exploding exponentially from growing connections among organizations, people and things, creating the need for an ever-accelerating 3-D Cycle.  This is especially relevant for retailers, and it presents both a challenge and an opportunity for competing with your digital value network in the global digital economy.

 

For example, redesigned, retail supply chains, enabled with analytics and augmented reality (AR), are not only meeting, but raising consumer expectations.

 

Amazon’s re-imagination of retail means that competitors must now think in terms of many-to-many flows of information, product, and cash along the path of least resistance for the consumer (and not just to and from their own locations).  This kind of value network strategy goes beyond determining where to put a warehouse and to which stores it should ship.  Competing in today’s multi-channel world can mean inventing new ways to do business, even in the challenging fashion space – and if it is happening in fashion, it would be naive to think rising consumer expectations can be ignored in other retail segments, or even other industries.  Consider a few retail examples:

Zara leverages advanced analytics, not only to sense trends, but also to optimize pricing and operations in their vertically integrated supply chain.

Stitch Fix is changing the shopping model completely, providing more service with less infrastructure.

Zolando has been so successful in creating a rapid response supply chain that they are now providing services to other retailers.

Nordstrom, of all organizations, is opening “inventoryless” stores.

Walmart has been on an incredible acquisition and partnership spree, recently buying Flipkart and, as early as two years ago, partnering with JD.com.  And, then, there is the success of Walmart.com.

Target is redesigning the way their DC’s work, creating a flow-through operation with smaller replenishment quantities.

 

Yet, many companies are choking on their own ERP data, as they struggle to make decisions on incomplete, incorrect and disparate data.  So, while the need for the 3-D Cycle to keep pace grows more intense, some organizations struggle to do anything but watch.  The winners will be those who can capitalize on the opportunities that the data explosion affords by making better decisions faster through advanced analytics.

 

The time required just to collect, clean, transform and synchronize data for analysis remains fundamental barrier to better detection, diagnosis and decisions in the value network.  A consolidated data store that can connect to source systems and on which data can be consolidated, programmatically “wrangled”, and updated into a supra data set forms a solid foundation on which to build better detection, diagnosis, and decision logic that can execute in “relevant time”.  This can seem like an almost insurmountable challenge, but it is not only doable with today’s technology, it’s becoming imperative.  And, it’s now possible to work off of a virtual supra data set, but that’s a discussion for another day.

 

Thanks for stopping by.  I’ll leave you with this quote from the book, Hit Refresh (a read I thoroughly enjoyed), by Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft:

 

“Success can cause people to unlearn the habits that made them successful in the first place.”

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About Arnold Mark Wells
Industry, software, and consulting background. I help companies do the things about which I write. If you think it might make sense to explore one of these topics for your organization, I would be delighted to hear from you. I am currently employed by AVATA, but I am solely responsible for the content in Supply Chain Action.

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